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Participate in the Share Your Opioid Story project

Telling the Stories of the Opioid Crisis – We want to hear from you

Have you lost a loved one or a friend to an opioid overdose?  Are you in recovery from opioid addiction?  Are you currently struggling with opioid addiction? Or maybe you have been affected by the opioid epidemic in some other way.

We want to talk to you, because we would like to hear your story. 

Dr. Glenn Sterner from the Justice Center for Research at Penn State University is working to collect the stories of the opioid crisis in our Philadelphia communities. We want to show the human side of the opioid epidemic, how it affects people of all backgrounds, and the impacts it has had on individuals, family members, friends and communities.

We have two goals.  First, we want to reduce the stigma surrounding the crisis and help people to talk about opioid addiction more openly. Second, we want to connect those affected by the opioid crisis, so you can know that you are not alone.  By doing so, we hope to assist those affected in getting the help they desperately need.

If you live in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties, we want to sit down with you and hear your story of how the opioid epidemic has affected your life.  From this interview, we will document your story and post it in on an online website we are in the process of creating that will share your story and the story of others across the Philadelphia region and across Pennsylvania.

If you are interested in sharing your story, please email shareopioidstories@gmail.com or call 814-867-3295.  We will connect with you as soon as possible.  Thank you for your interest.

Glenn Sterner Ph.D., featured on Pittsburgh’s NPR News Station

Article discusses Telling the Stories of the Opioid Epidemic in the Philadelphia Region project led by Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner

Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner’s project Share Your Opioid Story: A Collaboration between Independence Clue Cross Foundation, The Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs, and Penn State University was recently highlighted in The Inquirer. The project will tell the individual stories of the opiate crisis in the Philadelphia Region, addressing the stigma associated with opioid addiction. The stories will be made available to the public via an interactive website in the spring.

The Justice Center for Research has open position for Postdoctoral Scholar

Postdoctoral Scholar in Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Crime and Victimization

The Center invites applications for a postdoctoral scholar position to begin June 1, 2018 or as soon as practical thereafter. The JCR supports innovative criminal justice research focused on the connections between research, policy, and practice. The successful applicant will collaborate with Dr. Eric Baumer in the Department of Sociology and Criminology on research that focuses on the spatial and temporal dynamics of crime and victimization. Applications are encouraged from both current Ph.D. candidates (an appointment to the position is contingent on completing all requirements for the degree by the appointment date) and scholars who have completed the Ph.D. within the past two years.  A Ph.D. in sociology, criminology, economics, public policy, or a related field is required. Preference will be given to candidates with advanced training in statistics or methods of causal inference and to those with research interests in communities and crime and/or crime trends. Responsibilities may include data collection and/or management; data analyses; preparation of grant proposals, manuscripts, and conference presentations; and participation in graduate student mentoring. In addition to collaborative projects, the scholar will have access to exceptional resources to facilitate his or her independent research. The JCR has an outstanding repertoire of faculty affiliates, seed funding resources, and externally funded ongoing research projects. The initial appointment will be for one year, with the potential for a second year contingent on the candidate’s productivity and the availability of funding. Salary range for this position is $50,000 to $60,000. To apply and be considered for this opportunity, please submit a letter of interest and CV here. If selected as a finalist for the position, recommendation letters will be requested. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.  For more information about the position, please contact Professor Baumer (epbaumer@psu.edu).

CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go to http://www.police.psu.edu/clery/ , which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

Job URL: https://psu.jobs/job/75610

Inmate society research review featured in Penn State News

Inmate society research review featured in Penn State News

Image: © Ztranger/iStock.com

Derek Kreager, Center Director, and Candace Kruttschnitt, University of Toronto and Center collaborator, discuss their recent paper "Inmate Society in the Era of Mass Incarceration" with Penn State News. Their review of contemporary inmate social organization research, published in the Annual Review of Criminology, can be found here

Criminology Undergraduate Research Opportuniuty

Dr. Derek Kreager, Center Director, is seeking two undergraduate research assistants to help support the Reentry Prison Inmate Study.  More information can be found here.

The Daily Collegian article highlights Dr. Glenn Sterner’s research on the opioid crisis

A recent article in The Daily Collegian features an interview with Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., and Peter Forster, Associate Dean, College of Information Sciences and Technology, on their work on the opioid crisis. The Identifying and Informing Strategies for Disrupting Drug Distribution Networks project was recently awarded nearly a $1 million grant by the National Institute of Justice. The project team consists of Principal Investigators: Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., Ashton Verdery, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Shannon Monnat, Associate Professor, Sociology, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Co-Investigators: Peter Forster, Associate Dean, College of Information Sciences and Technology, Gary Zajac, Managing Director, Justice Center for Research, and Scott Yabiku, Department of Sociology and Criminology. Read the full article here.

Learn more about the project here.

Opioid distribution networks study, led by Glenn Sterner, featured in Penn State News

Opioid distribution networks study, led by Glenn Sterner, featured in Penn State News

Image: gemphotography/iStock.com

The recent Penn State News article "Penn State Social Science Researchers Collaborate to Study Opioid Epidemic" highlights projects being led by Justice Center postdoctoral scholar, Glenn Sterner.  Read the full article here.

Criminology Forum 10/20, “Facial Profiling in the Halls of Justice: Race, Appearance and Criminal Punishment”

Please join us for our upcoming Criminology Forum.

Brian Johnson, Ph.D., Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland will be our guest speaker for the next Criminology Forum. 

Date: Friday, October 20

Room: 406 Oswald Tower

Time: 3:00-4:00pm

“Facial Profiling in the Halls of Justice: Race, Appearance and Criminal Punishment”

Brian D. Johnson is a Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. He received his Ph.D. in Crime, Law & Justice in 2003 from the Pennsylvania State University. His dissertation was supported by the Forrest Crawford Fellowship for Ethical Inquiry and received the Penn State Alumni Association Dissertation Award. In 2008 Dr. Johnson received the American Society of Criminology Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award. His current research interests include contextual variations in sentencing, racial and ethnic relations in society, and the use of advanced statistical modeling techniques to study criminal processes.

Available online via Zoom: 483-756-121

Meeting ID to join: https://psu.zoom.us/j/483756121

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Justice Center for Research and the Department of Sociology and Criminology.


Justice Center for Research Founding Director and 2017 recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based Crime Policy authors article on efforts in evidence-based crime policy

Dr. Doris MacKenzie, Justice Center for Research Founding Director, was one of the recipients of the  2017 Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based Crime Policy. The Fall 2017 issue of Translational Criminology features Dr. MacKenzie’s perspective on her efforts in evidence-based crime policy. Congratulations Dr. MacKenzie!

The issue is available here.

Dr. MacKenzie’s article is on page 16.

Study on IQ scores and criminal thinking in Criminal Justice and Behavior

An article titled, “Measuring the Criminal Mind: The Relationship Between Intelligence and CSS-M Results Among a Sample of Pennsylvania Prison Inmates” looks at the relationship between IQ and criminal thinking. The article is featured in Criminal Justice and Behavior. The authors Michaela Soyer and Susan McNeeley are Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Alumni, now at Hunter College and Minnesota Department of Corrections, respectively, Gary Zajac is the Managing Director of the Justice Center for Research, and Bret Bucklen is the PADOC Research Director.

The article is available here.

Upcoming Criminology Forum 10/13- The Justice Center for Research and Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing: Missions and Initiatives

Please join us for our first Criminology Forum of the semester.

Rhys HesterPh.D., Deputy Director, Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing and Senior Lecturer of Sociology and Criminology at Penn State, University Park, and Derek Kreager, Ph.D., Director, Justice Center for Research and Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Penn State, University Park, will be our guest speakers for the next Criminology Forum. 

Date: FRIDAY, 10/13

Place: ROOM 406, OSWALD TOWER

Time: 3:30 - 4:30 P.M.

“The Justice Center for Research and Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing: Missions and Initiatives”

Dr. Rhys Hester is the Deputy Director of the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Penn State. He holds a PhD in Criminology and Criminal Justice as well as a JD. Prior to his current position at the Commission, Dr. Hester was a Research Fellow in Sentencing Law and Policy at the Robina Institute, University of Minnesota Law School. He teaches courses related to courts, constitutional law, and criminal law and procedure. His research has been published in academic journals and law reviews including Criminology, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, and (forthcoming) Crime and Justice: A Review of Research.

Dr. Derek Kreager is Director of the Justice Center for Research, Professor of Criminology, Sociology, and Demography, co-funded faculty member of the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), and an associate of the Population Research Institute (PRI). He received his M.A. and PhD from the University of Washington and his B.S. from the United States Military Academy. He has been a faculty member at PSU since 2006. His research lies at the intersection of social networks, crime, and the life course. Most recently, he has led the portfolio of Prison Inmate Networks Studies (PINS) focused on the social networks, health and re-entry experiences of male and female inmates in PA state prisons. This work has been supported by grants from NSF, NIH, and NIJ, funded four PSU graduate students, and resulted in papers published in ASR, Social Networks, and Justice Quarterly.

Available online via Zoom: https://psu.zoom.us/j/561278889

Meeting ID to join: 561-278-889

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Justice Center for Research and the Department of Sociology and Criminology.

Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner speaks to the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia on the opioid crisis

Justice Center for Research’s Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner spoke on September, 14th to the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia on his work on the Opioid Crisis. Invited by Keith Wardrip, Community Development Research Manager, Dr. Sterner led a conversation on his work in three projects across 16 counties in the State of Pennsylvania to catalyze an exchange on how the Community Development Studies and Education Department might develop opportunities to address the opioid crisis in their service region. 

http://www.justicecenter.la.psu.edu/research/opiate-epidemic


Featured article on the opioid crisis by Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, in Journal of Change

A Special Edition of the Journal of Change on the opioid crisis, published by the Independence Blue Cross Foundation features an article by Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar. Dr. Sterner’s article “Seeing Past Stigma: 4 Ways to Confront Bias Toward Opioid Addiction” encourages individuals to consider the stereotypes surrounding opioid addiction and offers steps to alleviate the stigma associated with addiction.

Check out Dr. Sterner’s article here

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner featured in DOJ OJP Diagnostic Center Blog

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., discusses the Opioid Crisis in the DOJ OJP Diagnostic Center blog. In the blog, Dr. Sterner highlights current work with the Pennsylvania State Police and offers suggestions for the future on how we can examine drug trends. Check out Dr. Sterner's blog piece here.

Upcoming Opioid Addiction Listening Sessions in York and Franklin Counties

Upcoming Listening Sessions on Opioid Addiction will be held in York and Franklin County from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM on September 20th and October 5th, respectively.

At the Listening Sessions, local and state officials will discuss available local and state resources for opioid addiction available for public access.

We are interested in hearing the audience’s perspective on additional services needed in the community to combat the opioid crisis in their community.

The Listening Sessions are a collaboration between the York County Coalition, Franklin County Overdose Drug Task Force, and The Pennsylvania Coalition for Addressing Heroin and Opioid Addiction (PaCHOA). Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., will be hosting and coordinating the event in his role as a Chair of PaCHOA. 

To sign up for the York County Listening Session: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/opioid-addiction-listening-session-tickets-37341084188

To sign up for the Franklin County Listening Session: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/opioid-addiction-listening-session-franklin-county-tickets-37345713033

The Justice Center for Research has open position for Research Technologist

The Justice Center for Research is seeking a candidate for a Research Technologist position in the area of criminal justice research. This position will offer the opportunity for involvement in innovative research projects being conducted by The Justice Center for Research and its affiliate faculty. You can learn more about the position here

Op Ed by Glenn Sterner and Diana Fishbein featured in The Hill

Glenn Sterner and Diana Fishbein wrote an Op Ed on the need for national leadership to fight the opioid crisis.  Read the full article in The Hill here

A colloquium to establish The Consortium for Public Scholars

Glenn Sterner and collaborators to develop The Consortium for Public Scholars.

 

 

October 12-13, 2017

The Penn State Center | 675 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, PA

This colloquium is being held to develop The Consortium for Public Scholars. This colloquium is open to university professionals, community professionals, community residents, and advanced high school, undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in the Philadelphia region.

Public scholarship refers to knowledge generation and transfer initiatives developed and conducted with and for the public. When engaged in such endeavors, both local and expert knowledge is appreciated and utilized to develop a more nuanced understanding of an issue for public benefit. This paradigm challenges higher education professionals to see their work for the university as embedded parts of external systems in which their skills, knowledge, and resources are insufficient without the skills, knowledge, and resources of local community members. It also requires community professionals and residents to examine their role in their communities, exploring how they can meld their expertise and experience to address public issues. Public scholarship products reflect a critical, discursive, dialogic perspective that tethers knowledge with action; encourages local results with an eye toward broader application; and requires sharing of both knowledge and process in ways that are publicly accessible in terms of language and distribution.

While initiatives exist that bind together individuals who are dedicated to outreach and/or engagement, there are relatively few opportunities for all types public scholars to collaborate and share knowledge across disciplines, interest areas, and categories of work. This colloquium aims to address this concern by developing a consortium of public scholars across institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations, private businesses, and the community in the Philadelphia region. We use the term scholar broadly to include any individual interested in sharing their knowledge of their work in addressing public issues, not only those involved in academia. If this is you, we hope that you will participate. The organizing purpose of this colloquium is to share examples of best practices for public scholarship, and co-develop a path forward for the consortium.

The detailed schedule for the colloquium will be updated shortly. The colloquium will take place at the Penn State Center Philadelphia, and will be October 12, 2017, 8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m., and October 13, 2017, 8:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Registration Fee*:
Early bird: $25 until September 1, 2017
Regular: $35 until September 18, 2017
Late: $50 until October 1, 2017
Same day: $75


Information on registration may be found here: http://www.cvent.com/d/25qgdc 

Registration is limited to 50 people, so please register before the event is full.

Please consider presenting a paper at the colloquium on your public scholarship. If you are a student (advanced high school, undergraduate, and graduate or professional student) you are encouraged to participate in the Student Poster Session as well. You can find the call for abstracts here. Abstracts for papers are due September 1, 2017. Abstracts for student posters are due September 1, 2017.

The Colloquium to Establish the Consortium for Public Scholars is sponsored by:
The Justice Center for Research, Penn State University
The Penn State Center Philadelphia
Pennsylvania Campus Compact
The Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education, Penn State University
Penn State Abington

 

*If you are unable to afford the registration fee, please contact us as we will have a limited amount of sponsored registrations

2017 College of the Liberal Arts Office Olympics

2017 College of the Liberal Arts Office Olympics

From left to right: Eunice Hockenberry, Laura Reddington Moser, Amy Schmoeller, Renee Kennedy, and Elaine Arsenault

The 2017 College of the Liberal Arts Office Olympics were held on 8/1 on the Moore Building Lawn. The Oswald Ocelots, consisting of staff members from the Department of Sociology and Criminology: Amy Schmoeller, Renee Kennedy, and Eunice Hockenberry and Justice Center for Research team members: Laura Reddington Moser and Elaine Arsenault took home the bronze medal in the "Rubber Band Snap" challenge.  Teams participated in fundraising efforts throughout the year and raised over $16,000 for the Centre County United Way. The Oswald Ocelots were the third place team in the fundraising challenge.

Justice Center for Research Founding Director, Doris L. MacKenzie receives the Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based Crime Policy

Justice Center for Research Founding Director, Doris L. Mackenzie, was awarded the CEBCP Distinguished Achievement Award in Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University on June 26. “This award recognizes outstanding achievements and contributions by individuals in academia, practice, or the policy arena who are committed to a leadership role in advancing the use of scientific research evidence in decisions about crime and justice policies. This role includes notable efforts in connecting criminology, law and society researchers with criminal justice institutions, or advancing scientific research more generally in crime and justice. The award is conferred yearly.” Congratulations Dr. MacKenzie!

http://cebcp.org/distinguished-achievement-award/

Doris Award 1

CEBCP Director Cynthia Lum, Funding Justice Center Director Doris L. MacKenzie, and CEBCP Executive Director David Weisburd

Doris Award 2

Funding Justice Center Director Doris L. MacKenzie

Doris Award 3

Funding Justice Center Director Doris L. MacKenzie standing with Justice Center Director Gary Zajac

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., presents at the International Network for Social Network Analysis

Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner presented at the International Network for Social Network Analysis (INSNA) in Beijing, China on June 3. His poster titled “Networks of Influence: Exploring Criminal Justice Campaign Finance in a Pennsylvania County.” The presentation highlighted several findings from a study that utilizes a social network approach to examine the network of campaign contributions to elected criminal justice system officials in one county in Pennsylvania (PA).  The study focused on two main research questions: do donors contribute to more than one elected criminal justice official in this county in PA? and is there a network of donors contributing to elected criminal justice officials in this county in PA?

http://insna.org/sunbelt2017/

Justice Center Graduate Student Julia Laskorunsky Defends Dissertation

Justice Center Graduate Student, Julia Laskorunsky defended her dissertation titled, “The Color of Risk: Unpacking the Implications of Actuarial Risk Prediction at Sentencing,” on June 16. Her dissertation committee consisted of Jeffery Ulmer (Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate), Eric Baumer (Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate), Gary Zajac (Justice Center for Research Director), and Christopher Zorn (Political Science). Congratulations to Dr. Laskorunsky on her hard work!

Julia's Defense Picture

From Left to Right: Christopher Zorn, Jeffery Ulmer, Julia Laskorunsky, Gary Zajac, and Eric Baumer

Why Social Science?

"Because social science drives smart investments in public safety," writes Nancy La Vigne, Director of the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute and Chair of the Crime and Justice Alliance. Read her article on how findings from criminology help us answer crucial questions about crime and our justice system on the Why Social Science Blog.

“Where “Old Heads” Prevail: Inmate Hierarchy in a Men’s Prison Unit” published in American Sociological Review

Derek Kreager (Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate), Jacob Young (ASU), Dana Haynie (OSU), Martin Bouchard (Simon Fraser University), David Schaefer (UC Irvine), and Gary Zajac (Justice Center for Research Director) recently published an article in American Sociological Review. The article titled, “Where “Old Heads” Prevail: Inmate Hierarchy in a Men’s Prison Unit” uses narrative and social network data from inmates in a Pennsylvania prison to support the proposition that older and more experienced inmates ("old heads") serve as role models on the unit, fostering a positive and stable peer environment, as has been suggested by previous prison ethnographies.

The article is now available online:

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0003122417710462

Measures for Justice Launches Data Portal of Criminal Justice Performance Measures

Measures for Justice released a data portal freely available to the public to look at criminal justice performance measures at the county level for six launch states, including Pennsylvania, Florida, Washington, Utah, Wisconsin, and North Carolina. Justice Center for Research Graduate Student Alumni, Robert Hutchison, Senior Research Fellow at Measures for Justice contributed to this project. The data portal will serve as a resource to learn more about crime rates, legal context, and demographic information across counties.

To explore the data portal:

http://measuresforjustice.org

The Marshall Project article highlights the data portal:

https://www.themarshallproject.org/2017/05/23/the-new-tool-that-could-revolutionize-how-we-measure-justice

ASC Executive Board Releases Statement on Trump Administration's Policies Relevant to Crime and Justice

"The Trump administration has signaled its crime policy intentions through a series of Executive Orders signed in the President’s first several months in office. These executive orders demonstrate an incongruity between administrative policy efforts and well-established science about the causes and consequences of crime. Four general areas are especially emblematic of this problem."

Read full statement here

Glenn Sterner and Diane Felmlee publish article on the social networks of cyberbullying on Twitter

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, and Center Affiliate, Diane Felmlee’s article “The Social Networks of Cyberbullying on Twitter” will be published in the next issue of the International Journal of Technoethics.

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, and Center Affiliate, Diane Felmlee’s article “The Social Networks of Cyberbullying on Twitter” will be published in the next issue of the International Journal of Technoethics.   

Abstract: This research applies a social network perspective to the issue of cyber aggression, or cyberbullying, on the social media platform Twitter. Cyber aggression is particularly problematic because of its potential for anonymity, and the ease with which so many others can join the harassment of victims. Utilizing a comparative case study methodology, the authors examined thousands of Tweets to explore the use of denigrating slurs and insults contained in public tweets that target an individual's gender, race, or sexual orientation. Findings indicate cyber aggression on Twitter to be extensive and often extremely offensive, with the potential for serious, deleterious consequences for its victims. The study examined a sample of 84 aggressive networks on Twitter and visualize several social networks of communication patterns that emanate from an initial, aggressive tweet. The authors identify six social roles that users can assume in the network, noting differences in these roles by demographic category. Serious ethical concerns pertain to this technological, social problem.

http://www.igi-global.com/article/the-social-networks-of-cyberbullying-on-twitter/181646

Crim Forum- Bo Cleveland and Eric Connolly April 24th at 12:15 p.m.

Please join us Monday, April 24th in 406 Oswald Tower for the final Criminology Forum of the semester. Harrington "Bo" ClevelandPh.D., Associate Professor, Human Development and Family Studies Department, Penn State, University Park, and Eric J. Connolly, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, Penn State, Abington, will be our guest speakers.

The title of their talk is "Current Status and Future Directions for Research on Genetics and Crime," their talk will be focused around the topic of genetics and crime, including the future directions and challenges for research in this area.

Harrington “Bo” Cleveland is the Co-Director of the Gene-Environment Research Initiative at Penn State. He received his J. D. from Boston College, his Ph.D. in Family Studies and Human Development from the University of Arizona, and post-doctoral training in demography at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Research on Adolescence. His topical interests focus on person-by-context transactions affecting adolescent adjustment and substance use, with a long-term interest in gene x environment interactions and gene-environment correlations.

Eric J. Connolly’s research interests include biosocial criminology, criminological theory, and developmental/life-course criminology. His research focuses on the examination of genetic and environmental influences on criminal and delinquent behaviors across the life course. Some of his recent work has appeared in journals such as Child Development, Criminology, Journal of Criminal Justice, and Journal of Quantitative Criminology.

Tune in to the talk live via Adobe Connect:

https://meeting.psu.edu/clevelandconnolly/

Justice Center personnel receive certificate for completing Mental Health First Aid: Suicide Prevention Training

Laura Reddington Moser, Justice Center for Research Administrative Coordinator, and Elaine Arsenault, Research Assistant, participated in training on Mental Health First Aid and Suicide Prevention on March 24 at the Student Health Center at Penn State. Laura and Elaine learned strategies and solutions to assist individuals and participated in engaging activities that depicted the course content. Laura and Elaine received a certificate for the completion of the 8 hour training course. Congrats Laura and Elaine!

Researchers head to Rutgers University for PINS Meeting

Justice Center researchers attended the Prison Inmate Networks Study (PINS) Project Meeting at Rutgers University on March 27 and 28th. At the PINS Meeting, the team consisting of investigators: Derek Kreager (Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate), Gary Zajac (Justice Center for Research Director), Sara Wakefield (Rutgers University), Dana Haynie (Ohio State University), David Schaefer and Jacob Young (Arizona State University), Martin Bouchard (Simon Fraser University), and Michaela Soyer (Hunter College) discussed current projects and future publications.

 

PINS meeting 2017 photo

From left to right front row: Brianna Jackson (Graduate Student Assistant Justice Center for Research), Kim Davidson (PSU Graduate Student), Bret Bucklen (PADOC Research Director), Gary Zajac (Justice Center for Research Director), David Schaefer (Associate Professor ASU), Derek Kreager (Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate), Sara Wakefield (Associate Professor Rutgers University), Sadaf Hashimi (Rutgers University Graduate Student), Chase Montagnet (Rutgers University Graduate Student). Back row: Ted Greenfelder (PSU Graduate Student), Jacob Young (Assistant Professor ASU), Dana Haynie (Professor OSU), Martin Bouchard (Associate Professor Simon Fraser University), Corey Whichard (Graduate Student Assistant Justice Center for Research), Sade Lindsay (OSU Graduate Student), Elaine Arsenault (Research Assistant at Justice Center for Research), Michaela Soyer (Assistant Professor Hunter College), Gerardo Valente Cuevas (PSU Graduate Student), and Wade Jacobsen (PSU Graduate Student)

More information on the PINS projects:

http://justicecenter.psu.edu/research/pins

Peggy Giordano, Ph.D., speaker for the Justice Center for Research Distinguished Lecture Series 4/10

Peggy Giordano, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State University, presented her research for the Justice Center for Research Distinguished Lecture Series. 

Date: Monday, April 10th

Place: 406 Oswald Tower

Time: 12:00 - 1:00

“Parental Incarceration and Adolescent and Young Adult Well-being”

Dr. Giordano drew on recently collected quantitative and qualitative data to explore mechanisms underlying the association between parental incarceration and adolescent and young adult well-being.    

Peggy C. Giordano is Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State University.  Dr. Giordano’s research focuses on social network influences on adolescent and young adult problem behaviors, including delinquency, crime, and intimate partner violence.  She relies on qualitative as well as quantitative methods to explore the impact of family dynamics, peer influence, and romantic relationships in the etiology and course of these outcomes.  Her monograph on the experiences of a sample of highly delinquent youth (Legacies of Crime) centered on the intergenerational transmission of crime and other negative developmental outcomes, and more recent work examines the ways in which parental incarceration influences children’s behavior and well-being.  She currently directs a longitudinal study (The Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study) that has followed a large, diverse sample of respondents interviewed first as adolescents, and subsequently as they have navigated the transition to adulthood.   

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Justice Center for Research, the Population Research Institute, and the Department of Sociology and Criminology.

Peggy's talk photo

Dr. Osgood presenting the Justice Center for Research Distinguished Lecturer Award to Dr. Giordano

Peggy's Photo 2

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. publishes article on scholarship of teaching and learning

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. published an article in the recent North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture volume. Dr. Sterner and his colleagues Alison Harrell, Theodore R. Alter, and Jean Lonie article, "Student Perceptions of the Impact of their Diverse Study Abroad Experiences," details the motivations of undergraduates to participate in studying abroad.


http://nactateachers.org/index.php/volume-61-number-1-march-2017/2510-student-perceptions-of-the-impact-of-their-diverse-study-abroad-experiences

Justice Center Director and affiliates receive recognition at the Liberal Arts Researcher Appreciation Reception

Center Director Gary Zajac was recognized on April 12 at the College of the Liberal Arts 2017 Annual Researcher Appreciation Reception for having six consecutive years of external funding.

Center Director Gary Zajac was recognized on April 12 at the College of the Liberal Arts 2017 Annual Researcher Appreciation Reception for having six consecutive years of external funding.

Faculty Affiliates Wayne Osgood, Derek Kreager, Jeff Ulmer, Eric Baumer, and Ashton Verdery were also recognized for their outstanding accomplishments.

10-14 years of consecutive funding

D. Wayne Osgood

Derek Kreager

5-9 years of consecutive funding

Jeff Ulmer

Gary Zajac

First Grants as Penn Staters

Eric Baumer

Ashton Verdery


Glenn Sterner will serve as an expert panelist to The Penn State Abington Opioid Overdose Task Force

On Thursday, March 30, Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Dr. Glenn Sterner, will sit on a panel of experts to hear and evaluate Penn State Abington students’ innovative ideas on how to address the opiate epidemic.  These students have worked on this project this semester as part of their CRIMJ 415 course on Drug Control Policy in Comparative Perspective, taught by Dr. Oren Gur, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Penn State Abington.

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. will speak at Innovations to Address Opiate Addiction on 4/4

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. will speak at the Innovations to Address Opiate Addiction on Tuesday, April 4 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. This event will follow the the 3rd Annual Addiction Symposium where Dr. Sterner will also be speaking. 

http://justicecenter.psu.edu/news/glenn-sterner-ph-d-will-speak-at-the-third-annual-penn-state-addiction-symposium-on-4-4

Innovation Cafe

Criminology Forum: Michaela Soyer, Ph.D., 3/24

Michaela Soyer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Hunter College CUNY, will be our guest speaker for the next Criminology Forum. 

Date: Friday, March 24

Place: Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Time: 12:00-1:00

"A Dream Denied: Incarceration, Recidivism, and Young Minority Men"

Michaela Soyer received her PhD in Sociology from the University of Chicago. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Justice Center for Research at Penn State University. Her current work focuses on delinquency, incarceration, recidivism and social theory. Currently, Michaela is engaged in data collection for several collaborative mixed method projects about inmate networks and their significance for reentry and recidivism. Her talk will be about the role of the American Dream narrative in young minority men’s lives and their inability to act creatively in terms of a non-deviant self. 

Available online via Adobe Connect: https://meeting.psu.edu/michaelasoyer/

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner's work on the opioid epidemic on StateCollege.com

Glenn Sterner's, Ph.D., collaboration with the Pennsylvania State Police to combat the opioid epidemic featured on StateCollege.com

Check out the video: http://www.statecollege.com/news/local-news/police-and-penn-state-researchers-work-together-to-fight-opioid-crisis,1471540/

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. will speak at the Third Annual Penn State Addiction Symposium on 4/4

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner, Ph.D. will present at the Third Annual Penn State Addiction Symposium on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Junker Auditorium in the Penn State College of Medicine. The title of his talk will be “Corrective Connections:  Exploring Network Based Approaches to Alleviating the Opioid Epidemic” and will detail his work with social networks associated with the opioid epidemic.

Click here to learn more about the symposium

Following this event Dr. Sterner will speak at Innovations to Address Opiate Addiction.

http://justicecenter.psu.edu/news/add-edit-or-remove-a-portlet-above-the-content-glenn-sterner-ph-d-will-speak-at-innovations-to-address-opiate-addiction-on-4-4?_authenticator=18f39898a8f7d6ef2ff734dec271a58f039ec6c7

Criminology Forum: Gary Zajac, Ph.D., 3/13

Please join us for the upcoming Criminology Forum on Monday, March 13 in 406 Oswald from 12:00pm-1:00pm. Our speaker will be Gary Zajac, Ph.D. The topic of his talk will be "Evaluating the Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement Demonstration Field Experiment (HOPE DFE) – Results and Reactions."

This presentation will discuss results from the four site Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement Demonstration Field Experiment (HOPE DFE) that was conducted by the Penn State Justice Center for Research in collaboration with RTI, International, funded by the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Assistance.  HOPE is a probation supervision strategy that involves the application of swift, certain and fair sanctioning in response to violations.  HOPE had been originated in Hawaii in the mid-2000s and had spread rapidly throughout the U.S. since.  Early evaluations of HOPE in Hawaii showed promising results, which have not been sustained in more recent evaluations, such as the current DFE and a similar evaluation conducted in Delaware. This forum will provide an overview of the DFGE results and discuss reactions to the DFE that touch upon the issue of advocacy in science.

Dr. Gary Zajac is the Managing Director of the Justice Center for Research at The Pennsylvania State University.  He has been Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on 15 Justice Center projects focusing on courts, corrections, sentencing and policing.  His studies at the Center have encompassed racial disparity in capital sentencing, rural criminology, implementation science, inmate social networks, evaluation of domestic relations programs, and specialty courts.  His scholarly work has appeared in many journals and books, including Journal of Experimental Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy, Crime & Delinquency, Criminal Justice and Behavior and The Prison Journal.  He has advised dozens of state, local and international corrections agencies and organizations on the development of research capacity and the implementation of research-based practice.

Available online via Adobe Connect: https://meeting.psu.edu/garyzajac/

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner discusses PA Opioid Epidemic

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner Ph.D., was featured in the College of the Liberal Arts news article. In the article Glenn discusses his work on the opioid epidemic in PA and the "Identifying and Informing Strategies for Disrupting Drug Distribution Networks" project. Collaborating on the project are Justice Center Faculty Affiliates, Ashton Verdery and Shannon Monnat, Justice Center Managing Director, Gary Zajac, and Pete Forster, Associate Dean, College of Information Sciences and Technology.

Read the full article here

Criminology Forum: Shannon Monnat, Ph.D., 2/27

Please join us for the upcoming Criminology Forum on Monday, February 27 in 406 Oswald from 12:15pm-1:15pm. Our speaker will be Shannon Monnat, Ph.D. The topic of her talk will be "Deaths of Despair from the Cities to the Hollers: Understanding Spatial Differences in U.S. Drug, Alcohol, and Suicide Morality."

Americans are killing themselves at an alarming rate. Since 1999, nearly 2 million people living in the U.S. died from causes related to drugs, alcohol, and suicide. Nationwide, the mortality rate from drug poisoning, alcohol poisoning, and suicide has increased by 63 percent since 1999. Most of this increase was driven by a surge in prescription opioid and heroin overdoses, but overdoses from other drugs, suicides by means other than drugs (especially guns), and alcohol-induced deaths also increased over this period. Drug, alcohol, and suicide deaths are not a random collection; they often derive from depression, distress, hopelessness, and chronic pain. Particularly striking is that drug, alcohol, and suicide mortality has increased during a period of declining mortality for other major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, most cancers, and motor vehicle accidents. There are pronounced spatial differences in drug, alcohol, and suicide mortality rates. Despite documentation of this spatial variation and clear clustering of high (and low) mortality rates, our understanding of these spatial differences is limited. Some have described drug, alcohol, and suicide mortality as “deaths of despair” and suggested that they are linked to economic dislocation and place-level downward mobility, but this contention has yet to be empirically tested. Accordingly, this presentation will describe spatial differences in county-level drug, alcohol, and suicide mortality rates and identify the population, economic, social, and infrastructural factors associated with these spatial differences.

Shannon Monnat is  Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology, Demography, and Sociology and a Research Associate in the Population Research Institute at Penn State.  She is also a Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.  Her research explores how economic, social, institutional, and policy factors are related to health and health disparities in the U.S. 

This talk will also be available via Adobe Connect Meeting:

https://meeting.psu.edu/shannonmonnat/

President Eric Barron's message to the Penn State community

President Eric Barron shares message with Penn State community after executive order on immigration. Offers recommendations for international students and faculty regarding travel. View the full message here:

http://news.psu.edu/story/447807/2017/01/29/administration/penn-state-president-shares-message-following-executive-order

Sexual Assault Forensic Examination and Training (SAFE-T) project commences

The Department of Justice, Office of Victims of Crime awarded $1.1 million to the Sexual Assault Forensic Examination and Training (SAFE-T) Center. The project will offer live-examination video conferencing by experts to victims of sexual assault in rural areas. The project is led by Sheridan Miyamoto, assistant professor of nursing, Janice Penrod, professor of nursing, and Lorah Dorn, professor of nursing and pediatrics. The project has many collaborators, including Gary Zajac, Director of the Justice Center.

Learn more about the project:

http://news.psu.edu/story/441132/2016/12/08/research/department-justice-grant-develop-pennsylvania-safe-t-center

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, will present at the Criminology Forum on 12/5

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner will be our speaker at the Criminology Forum on Monday, December 5th 12:00pm -1:00pm in 406 Oswald Tower. The topic of his talk will be “Network of Influence: Exploring Criminal Justice Campaign Finance in Montgomery County, PA.” Montgomery County had readily available public data that provided a convenience sample.

Post Citizens United, campaign contributions to elected officials in the US are a topic of great debate regarding the functioning of our democracy. The strongest opponents of financial contributions to elected official’s political campaigns allege the ability for individuals and organizations to utilize these contributions as a way to “buy campaigns” or leverage influence on elected officials. Even more insidious is the allegation that contributors aim to influence a network of campaigns, to manipulate a greater section of the democratic system of government. Much of the critiques and analyses regarding campaign contributions are aimed at high profile officials, i.e. US President, US Congress, or Governors. Less attention is given to local officials, especially those within the criminal justice system. This presentation highlights several preliminary findings from a pilot study that utilizes a social network approach to examine the network of campaign contributions to elected criminal justice system officials.

Tune in to the talk via Adobe Connect Meeting:

https://meeting.psu.edu/crimforumglennsterner/

Researchers from PINS present at the 8th Illicit Networks Workshop at The Museum of London

Justice Center researchers will present at the 8th Illicit Networks Workshop at The Museum of London on December 7. Dr. Derek Kreager, Justice Center Faculty Affiliate, will present on the Prison Inmate Networks Study (PINS) in a session on Policing, Prisons, and Courts.

‘Network Mechanisms in a Prison-Based Therapeutic Community’- Derek Kreager (Pennsylvania State University), Martin Bouchard (Simon Fraser), George De Leon (New York University), David Schaefer (Arizona State University), Jacob Young (Arizona State University), Dana Haynie (Ohio State University), Michaela Soyer (Hunter College), Gary Zajac (Pennsylvania State University).

Justice Center Researchers present at ASC

Justice Center researchers presented at The American Society of Criminology meeting in New Orleans November 16-19. The following presentations were given by researchers from the Justice Center for Research:

Considering Incentives in Money Generating Activities among an Incarcerated Sample- Holly Nguyen, PSU, Jeremy Staff, PSU, Gary Zajac, PSU, Derek Kreager, PSU, Thomas Loughran, University of Maryland

Results from the HOPE DFE Four-Site Randomized Control Trial- Pamela Lattimore, RTI International, Doris MacKenzie, PSU, Gary Zajac, PSU

From Cellblock to Community: A Longitudinal Analysis of Inmate Social Networks during Community Re-Entry- Corey Whichard, PSU

Reflected and Peer Appraisals in Prison-Based Therapeutic Community- Kim Davidson, PSU

Post-prison Social Networks and their Association with Recidivism- Hanneke Palmen, Leiden University, Derek Kreager, PSU, Sara Wakefield, Rutgers University, Anja Dirkzwager, NSCR, Paul Nieuwbeerta, Leiden University

When Onset Meets Desistance: Cognitive Transformation and Adolescent Marijuana Experimentation- Derek Kreager, PSU, Daniel T. Ragan, University of New Mexico, Holly Nguyen, PSU, Jeremy Staff, PSU

A different Method of Predicting Risk: Unpacking the Implications of a Statewide Sentencing Risk Assessment- Julia Laskorunsky, PSU

The Impact of Religiosity and Self-Concept on Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes- Brianna Jackson, PSU

HOPE Panel Presentation at APPAM

Justice Center researchers in collaboration with RTI, International presented at the 2016 APPAM Fall Research Conference on November 3 in Washington, DC.  The panel “Results from the HOPE Demonstration Field Experiment Four-Site Randomized Controlled Trial,” included the following presentations:

Implementation Fidelity and Experiences at Four HOPE DFE Sites- Gary Zajac, PSU, Debbie Dawes, RTI International, Elaine Arsenault, PSU, Susan Brumbaugh, RTI International

Does Swift, Certain, and Fair ‘Work’: Outcome Findings from the HOPE Demonstration Field Experiment- Pamela K. Lattimore, RTI International and Doris MacKenzie, PSU

What Does HOPE Probation Cost?- Alexander Cowell and Matthew DeMichele, RTI International

"Outcome Findings from the HOPE Demonstration Field Experiment" published in Criminology & Public Policy

The current issue of Criminology & Public Policy includes the “Outcome Findings from the HOPE Demonstration Field Experiment,” article. Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) is a probation program that involves swift, certain, and consistent sanctions. The team of researchers at the Justice Center for Research in collaboration with RTI, International tested the HOPE probation model in 4 sites across the country looking at the implementation of the program as well as recidivism outcomes. Justice Center Director, Dr. Gary Zajac led the process evaluation component of the HOPE DFE along with Research Assistant Elaine Arsenault, and former Justice Center Director Dr. Doris Layton MacKenzie was a Co-PI on the outcome evaluation phase with RTI.

View the article here:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-9133.12248/full

Dr. John Kramer to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award at ASC

Justice Center for Research Faculty Affiliate and Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Criminology Dr. John Kramer has been selected as the recipient of the  American Society of Criminology Division on Corrections and Sentencing’s Lifetime Achievement Award.  The Lifetime Achievement award honors an individual’s distinguished scholarship in the area of corrections and/or sentencing over a lifetime. Dr. Kramer will be recognized at the ASC conference in November.

Nancy Rodriguez, Ph.D., Director of the National Institute of Justice, will be our guest speaker for the next Criminology Forum

Dr. Rodriguez’ presentation “Strengthening Justice in the U.S.: The Impact of Scientific Research” will emphasize the critical role scientific research plays in strengthening the criminal justice system. She will also discuss how evidence-based knowledge can directly solve challenges faced by hard-working criminal justice practitioners, whether in law enforcement, corrections or the judicial system.

Date: Thursday, November 10th

Place: 406 Oswald Tower

Time: Noon - 1:00 pm

Available via Adobe Connect: https://meeting.psu.edu/nancyrodriguezcriminologyforum/

Bio: Nancy Rodriguez is the Director of the National Institute of Justice. During 1998‒2015, Dr. Rodriguez was a professor at Arizona State University’s (ASU’s) School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. In 2012‒2014, Dr. Rodriguez served as the Associate Dean for Student Engagement in the College of Public Programs at ASU. Her research interests include inequality (race/ethnicity, class, crime, and justice) and the collateral consequences of imprisonment. Throughout her career, she has engaged in use-inspired research and has been involved in many successful collaborations with law enforcement, courts, and correctional agencies. She is the author of over 50 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and technical reports. Dr. Rodriguez received a BA from Sam Houston State University and a PhD from Washington State University.

Please join us for a reception with Director Rodriguez from 1 pm - 1:45 pm in 406 Oswald following her talk. Refreshments will be served.

 This lecture is co-sponsored by the Justice Center for Research, the Department of Sociology and Criminology, and the Population Research Institute.

Dr. Derek Kreager receives NIJ grant for Women’s Prison Inmate Networks Study

Congratulations to Dr. Derek Kreager and a team of researchers recently received a three-year National Institute of Justice grant for their project, “Understanding Incarceration and Re-Entry Experiences of Female Inmates and their Children: The Women’s Prison Inmate Networks Study (WO-PINS).”

This study will explore the prison and re-entry experiences of female inmates incarcerated in two Pennsylvania prisons. In Phase 1, investigators will reveal each units' informal organization and culture using innovative social network data that maps the unit's friendship network, status hierarchy, and romantic ties. Network analyses will test hypotheses for the sources of prison status and the associations between inmate social position and outcomes such as prison victimization, mental health, official misconduct, and family visitation. In Phase 2, parole-eligible inmate respondents will be administered semi-structured qualitative and network interviews to garner their future expectations, social capital, and preparations for community re-entry. Women's expected social networks provide a unique glimpse into the re-entry process that can later be compared to actual networks upon release. This phase of the project has clear implications for family reintegration, employment, post-release program participation, and relapse/recidivism. Contemporaneously, child and caregiver interviews will be conducted for inmate respondents who are mothers. These interviews will capture the well-being, fears, aspirations, and preparations of inmates' families and surrogate parents prior to prison release. During Phase 3, investigators will conduct two post-release community interviews of Phase 2 respondents to understand how the previously imprisoned women, their children, and caregivers have adjusted to life after prison and if their envisioned plans came to fruition. Additionally, analyses of longterm arrest and reincarceration will be conducted for all surveyed prison units. The goals of this phase will be to identify and drill down on the mechanisms underlying successful prison re-entry and criminal desistance.

Investigators include:

  • Derek Kreager (PSU Soc/Crim) - Principal Investigator
  • Gary Zajac (PSU Justice Center Director) – Co-Investigator
  • Dana Haynie (OSU) – Co-Principal Investigator
  • Sara Wakefield (Rutgers) – Co-Principal Investigator
  • Michaela Soyer (Hunter College) – Co-Investigator

Advisory Board – Bret Bucklen (PADOC), Jeffrey Beard (PSU Justice Center), Candace Kruttschnitt (Toronto), Rebecca Shafler (Minnesota) 

The project also involves the following Penn State Criminology graduate students and research associates:
Corey Whichard, Kim Davidson, Ted Greenfelder, Brianna Jackson, Elaine Arsenault, and Gerardo Cuevas


WO-PINS was recently featured in a Penn State News article, the article can be found here:

http://news.psu.edu/story/433229/2016/10/21/research/studying-effects-incarceration-women-and-their-families



Justice Center Researchers Present on Rural Opiate Users

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner and Faculty Affiliates Shannon Monnat and Ashton Verdery participated in a panel presentation at the Penn State Mini-Conference on Social Networks, Infectious Disease, and Hidden Populations on "Brainstorming Discussion of Methods for Sampling Rural Opiate Users."

Evaluation of the Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement Demonstration Field Experiment (HOPE DFE) Summary

Summary results of the evaluation of the Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement Demonstration Field Experiment (HOPE DFE) available. This project has replicated the original Hawaii HOPE model of swift, certain and fair sanctioning in probation in four states (Arkansas, Massachusetts, Oregon and Texas).  Learn more about the project and view the results on our Research Page.

Glenn Sterner, Ph.D., publishes paper on rural broadband access

Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner recently published an article titled “Unequal Access: An Examination of the Barriers Rural Areas Continue to Face in Broadband Development” in the peer reviewed volume Management of Sustainable Development in Rural Areas: At Local and Regional Scales. The article can be found here: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/handle/239325

Justice Center Faculty Affiliate Dr. Derek Kreager discusses the Prison Inmate Networks Study

Dr. Derek Kreager spoke with Penn State News about the Prison Inmate Networks Study (PINS) which looked at the social networks of inmates and how networks influence an inmate's health. The Reentry Prison Inmate Networks Study (R-PINS) study is currently following the participants from the PINS study, looking at ties with individuals upon reentry into society. An upcoming project is also highlighted that will look at social networks in therapeutic substance abuse treatment communities. Check out the story here:

http://news.psu.edu/story/417522/2016/07/15/research/social-networks-prisons-impact-prisoner-health-and-re-entry

Students Present Posters on Racially Specific and Gender Related Cyberbulling on Twitter

Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar, Glenn Sterner and Faculty Affiliate Diane Felmlee and undergraduate students Tyler Stumm and Kaitlin Shartle and graduate student Paulina Rodis presented their research at the Undergraduate Exhibition and Graduate Exhibition.

Asian Cyberbullying on Twitter Networks

The Social Networks of Gender Related Cyberbullying on Twitter

The Social Networks of Racially Specific Cyberbullying on Twitter

Justice Center for Research Postdoctoral Scholar Glenn Sterner Presents Poster at the Sunbelt Conference of the International Network for Social Network Analysis

Glenn Sterner, Justice Center Postdoctoral Scholar and Diane Felmlee, Faculty Affiliate present poster on "The Social Networks of Cyberbullying on Twitter" at the Sunbelt Conference of the International Network for Social Network Analysis in Newport Beach, California.

The Social Networks of Cyberbullying on Twitter

Justice Center Graduate Assistant Julia Laskorunsky and Faculty Affiliate Jeffery Ulmer Publish Paper

Justice Center for Research Graduate Student Assistant Julia Laskorunsky and Justice Center Faculty Affiliate Jeffery Ulmer have published a paper in the Journal of Crime and Justice. The paper explores the effect of juvenile adjudications on sentencing outcomes in criminal court proceedings. The article can be found here:http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjcj20/39/1